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General Submission

Apology

Translated by Benjamin Jowett

Socrates' Defense

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On the Construction of Superior Minds

I felt it necessary to write this essay, because as I read the giant minds of the past, I realize that they do not say things simply enough sometimes. At the rate, which we are growing intellectually today, they certainly do not necessarily say things with the right kind of punch, and brevity that we are accustomed to.Here are some ideas about how I constructed the system I use now to understand the world and to talk about why these steps were necessary to understanding that which is most important, the future synthesis of humanity.

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All things are infinite in number and smallness

All things were together, infinite both in number and in smallness; for the small also was infinite. And when they were all together, nothing was clear and distinct because of their smallness; for air and aether comprehended all things, both being infinite; for these are present in everything, and are greatest both as to number and as to greatness.

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Euthydemus

Translated by Benjamin Jowett

Crito. Who was the person, Socrates, with whom you were talking yesterday at the Lyceum? There was such a crowd around you that I could not get within hearing, but I caught a sight of him over their heads, and I made out, as I thought, that he was a stranger with whom you were talking: who was he?

Socrates. There were two, Crito; which of them do you mean?

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Thus Spake Zarathustra, Chapter I. The Three Metamorphoses

Three metamorphoses of the spirit do I designate to you: how the spirit becometh a camel, the camel a lion, and the lion at last a child.

Many heavy things are there for the spirit, the strong load-bearing spirit in which reverence dwelleth: for the heavy and the heaviest longeth its strength.

What is heavy? so asketh the load-bearing spirit; then kneeleth it down like the camel, and wanteth to be well laden.

What is the heaviest thing, ye heroes? asketh the load-bearing spirit, that I may take it upon me and rejoice in my strength.

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On Universal Humanism

It is so intellectually important that men become conscious of their most basic objective being. It is what you are, beyond whatever choices you are able to find for yourself, yet it is the last frontier found after searching through a sea of trivialities, if it is found at all. I would never say it is easy, or obvious. Never trust anyone who is so heavy handed about their own viewpoint. Nevertheless, when you seek it out, and you have put in your time and duty to understand, it is waiting to give you ground. This ground is observable in the continuity between all men, and animals alike.

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All things were together

But before these were separated, when all things were together, not even was any colour clear and distinct; for the mixture of all things prevented it, the mixture of moist and dry, of the warm and the cold, and of the bright and the dark (since much earth was present), and of germs infinite in number, in no way like each other; for none of the other things at all resembles the one the other.

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Phaedrus

Translated by Benjamin Jowett

Socrates. My dear Phaedrus, whence come you, and whither are you going?

Phaedrus. I come from Lysias the son of Cephalus, and I am going to take a walk outside the wall, for I have been sitting with him the whole morning; and our common friend Acumenus tells me that it is much more refreshing to walk in the open air than to be shut up in a cloister.

Soc. There he is right. Lysias then, I suppose, was in the town?

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